Explore Our Curriculum

US World Languages

 
The World Languages Department provides Crossroads students the opportunity to study Modern and Classical Languages.
 
In Latin, students learn to read and translate Latin and expand their understanding of language structure, grammar, and written expression. Students are taught to apply previously learned material to new contexts and to take risks in developing their linguistic instincts. The Latin curriculum includes vocabulary acquisition, study of grammar and syntax, history, culture, literature, and philosophy. Written compositions, visual art projects, peer partnering, group work and large group discussions enhance the learning process. Students in Classics have many opportunities to engage in regional, statewide, and national activities through Junior Classical League events. Classics students also take the National Latin Exam.  
 
The study of Modern Languages (Chinese, French, and Spanish) leads students to proficiency in the target language in both oral and written forms. Teachers employ methodologies that focus on developing speaking, writing, reading, and listening with an emphasis on language immersion. In addition, students explore cultural differences through the discussion of politics, social justice, economic issues, literature, and the arts. Courses are taught in the target language to help students reach proficiency. Students taking French and Spanish have the opportunity to participate in exchanges with schools in France and Spain.
 
Students wishing to start a Modern Language above level 1 are placed in the appropriate course based on their performance on a placement test and oral interview.
  • CAS French Language

    Crossroads Advanced Studies: French Language: Cultural Topics, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French 3 Honors or French 4 with a B+ or better and/or teacher recommendation (series of two 1-year courses).
    This course is designed for students who demonstrate a strong level of oral and written proficiency in French and who are motivated to refine their writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills through exposure to aspects of French and Francophone culture. Consistent use of French in the classroom develops skills in aural comprehension and oral expression. Productive and receptive skills in writing are refined through careful selections of written compositions and reading assignments drawn from French literature, magazines, newspapers, or electronic media. Aspects of the French and Francophone culture are examined through designated topics. The course is task-based. Students read various forms of texts, view films, documentaries, and other audio-visual materials, conduct their own research and produce oral and written work based on their findings. By the end of this course, students can converse in everyday social interactions and discuss a wide range of topics. They can write argumentative essays of at least 400 words that show a deep knowledge of the cultural topics discussed in class. They demonstrate a mastery of argumentative language in debates about current events and social issues.
  • CAS Latin Poetry and Prose

    Crossroads Advanced Studies: Latin Poetry and Prose, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Latin 4 Honors with a B+ or better and teacher recommendation.
    Advanced Studies in Latin Poetry and Prose introduces students to a variety of authors and genres and/or an individual author in depth, with a view to a sophisticated appreciation of Latin literature, its cultural context, and legacy. Students admitted to this course must meet all criteria:  to be highly motivated, to have excelled in Latin 4 Honors, and to maintain excellent standing throughout the end of Latin 4 Honors. The aims and skills approximate those of a college-level course of the fourth through sixth semesters. Readings are selected from such authors as Catullus, Cicero, Vergil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Seneca the Younger, Pliny the Younger, and Tacitus, representing such genres as epic, lyric, love elegy, history, oratory, and letters.
  • CAS Spanish Language

    Crossroads Advanced Studies: Spanish Language: Cultural Topics, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Spanish 3 Honors or Spanish 4 with a B+ or better and/or teacher recommendation (series of two 1-year courses).
    This course is designed for students who demonstrate a strong level of oral and written proficiency in Spanish and who are motivated to refine their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. through exposure to aspects of Spanish and Hispanic culture. The course offers a review of grammatical structures and syntax and introduces students to new idiomatic expressions and special nuances of the language. Grammar and vocabulary are practiced in the context of selected cultural topics particular to the Spanish speaking world. Aspects of the Spanish and Hispanic culture are examined through designated topics such as the role of women in society, the culture of “machismo,” religions, traditions and customs, political regimes, music, and other social justice issues among others.  This course is task-based, and students read various forms of texts, view films, documentaries, and other audio-visual materials, conduct their own research, and produce oral and written work based on their findings. By the end of this course, students can converse and discuss a wide range of topics. They can write argumentative essays of at least 400 words that show a deep knowledge of the cultural topics discussed in class. They demonstrate a mastery of argumentative language in debates about current events and social issues.
  • Chinese / Mandarin 1

    Chinese/Mandarin 1, 1-year foreign language credit.
    Students in this course have no prior knowledge of Chinese. They are introduced to the basics of the language and culture through active communication. There is a focus on the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Listening comprehension and oral expression skills are developed through the consistent use of the target language in the classroom as well as the use of authentic documents (real life recordings, songs, films etc.). Reading comprehension skills are developed through the use of varied Chinese texts, and writing assignments are modeled on the reading comprehension documents. The course is task based and involves numerous group activities. By the end of level 1, students use both the Pinyin phonetic system and Chinese characters and know approximately 300 words. They are able to introduce themselves and others, ask and answer questions about personal details such as where they live, people they know, and things they have. Students can interact in a simple way provided the other person is talking slowly and clearly. This course is taught entirely in Chinese.
  • Chinese / Mandarin 2

    Chinese/Mandarin 2, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Chinese/Mandarin 1 with a C or better and teacher recommendation*.
    Students in this course build on the basics of the language introduced in Chinese 1 while expanding their knowledge of the language and culture and developing their communication skills. Only Chinese is used in the classroom. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic documents and varied texts are used to refine students' listening, reading, and speaking skills. Writing assignments modeled on the reading comprehension texts can incorporate different time frames. The course is task based and involves numerous group activities. By the end of level 2, students use both the Pinyin phonetic system and Chinese characters and know approximately 600 words. Students understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to real-life situations such as asking directions, participating in sports, and seeing a doctor. They can communicate using phrases and simple sentences and can handle short social interactions in a variety of situations. They can describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and tastes and interests.
  • Chinese / Mandarin 3

    Chinese/Mandarin 3, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Chinese/Mandarin 2 with a C or better and teacher recommendation*.   
    Students in this course build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of the language and culture and developing their communication skills. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course is task based and involves numerous group activities, such as class discussions and projects. Consistent use of Chinese in the classroom develops skills in aural comprehension and oral expression. Students learn to use Chinese idioms, associated compounds, and most commonly used grammar patterns. They read and discuss a variety of authentic texts and explore the Chinese-speaking world through varied written and oral projects.  Reading and writing skills are refined through meaningful and engaging texts and compositions. By the end of level 3, students know 900 Chinese words and can write and understand different styles of narrative texts. They can ask and answer questions and can maintain simple conversations on most familiar topics using sentences and series of sentences.
  • Chinese / Mandarin 3 Honors

    Chinese/Mandarin 3 Honors, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Chinese/Mandarin 2 with a B+ or better and teacher recommendation*.
    This course is designed for students who have demonstrated superior writing and speaking skills as well as a mastery of the grammatical concepts presented in Mandarin 1 and Mandarin 2. Honors students are expected to be highly motivated, fully engaged, and willing to do more independent and rigorous work. They are expected to speak for greater periods of time and write more sophisticated compositions. Honors students are expected to learn about 1000 Chinese characters with their associated compounds. Honors Mandarin 3 students are combined with regular Mandarin 3 students. In order to remain in the Honors program, students are expected to maintain a grade of B or better at the end of the first semester. By the end of this course, students know 1000 Chinese words and can write and understand different styles of narrative texts. They can ask and answer complex questions and maintain conversations on a variety of topics. They can write and read basic argumentative texts.
  • Chinese/Mandarin 4

    Chinese/Mandarin 4, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Chinese/Mandarin 3 with a C+ or better and/or teacher recommendation*.
    This course aims to further develop and improve students’ communication skills in Mandarin. The class is taught with an equal emphasis on the following four skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course engages students in interactive activities and reading and writing practices. Many aspects of everyday Chinese culture are introduced through these activities. In addition, students explore cultural topics introduced through authentic materials such as short literary texts and films. Students will study topics related to contemporary China, while continuing to learn about China’s traditional culture, social life, hobbies, the environment, work, and education. By the end of level 4, students can communicate with relative ease and discuss topics of personal and general interest. They can understand the main idea when reading a variety of styles of texts and can describe and narrate events in all time frames using paragraph-like discourse when writing.
  • Classical Humanities Seminar

    Classical Humanities Seminar, 1-year academic elective credit (Does not fulfill language requirement).  Open to grades 10, 11 and 12 (also listed under Electives). Class is NOT offered 2018-2019.
    Classical Humanities Seminar is an interdisciplinary course. This seminar explores the literature, mythology, art, and archeology of ancient Greece and Rome and integrates the literature, art, music, and film of subsequent eras influenced by the Classical world. Students learn to appreciate critically the literature, art, and other means of expression by various cultures. They also discover connections among different modes of discourse. Each year the instructor organizes and unifies the curriculum around salient themes, such as love and war, transformation, and catharsis. Starting from ancient texts, such as Homer's Iliad, Aristophanes' Lysistrata, the lyric poetry of Sappho and Catullus, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Euripides' Hippolytus, Seneca's Phaedra, and Sophocles' Ajax, these themes are examined primarily through close analysis and discussion. Students create original works relating to the themes and thus participate in the humanistic tradition. This course may not be offered every year.
  • French 1

    French 1, 1-year foreign language credit.
    Students in this course have no prior knowledge of French. There is a focus on the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They are introduced to the basics of the French language and culture through active communication. Listening comprehension and oral expression skills are developed through the consistent use of the target language in the classroom as well as the use of documents created for native speakers. Reading comprehension skills are developed through the use of varied French texts created for native speakers. Writing assignments are modeled on the reading comprehension documents. The course is task-based and involves numerous group activities. By the end of level 1, students can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases to fulfill specific tasks. They can introduce themselves and others, ask and answer questions about personal details such as where one lives, people one knows, things one has. They are able to interact in a simple way provided the other person is talking slowly and clearly.
  • French 2

    French 2, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French 1 with a C or better and teacher recommendation*
    With this course, students build on the basics of the language introduced in French 1 while expanding their knowledge of the language and culture and developing their communication skills. Only French is used in the classroom. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic French resources are used to refine these skills. Writing assignments modeled on the reading comprehension texts can incorporate different time frames. The course is task-based and involves numerous group activities. By the end of level 2, students understand sentences and frequently-used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance. They can communicate in a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. They can describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment, and matters in areas of immediate need.
  • French 3

    French 3, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French 2 with a C or better and teacher recommendation*.
    With this course, students build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of French language and culture and developing their communication skills. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students move from talking about themselves and their community to talking about more general problems affecting the world. They learn to express their wishes, emotions and doubts, and to hypothesize in different time frames. Students read and discuss a variety of authentic French texts and are encouraged to explore the Francophone world through special written and oral projects. Compositions on topics of interest are assigned regularly. The course is task-based and involves numerous group activities. Consistent use of French in the classroom develops skills in aural comprehension and oral expression. Productive and receptive skills in writing are refined through careful selections of written compositions and reading assignments. By the end of level 3, students can ask and answer questions, maintain simple conversations on familiar topics using sentences and strings of sentences, and write and understand different styles of narrative texts.
  • French 3 Honors

    French 3 Honors, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French 2 with a B+ or better and teacher recommendation*.
    This course is designed for students who would like to continue with advanced French classes. Students build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of French language and culture and developing their communication skills. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: reading, speaking, listening, and writing. Students work at a faster and more intensive pace than in regular French 3 and are expected to show greater proficiency. Oral communication is also stressed in the form of class discussions involving the readings and cultural topics. Students have opportunities to work on group projects and are encouraged to choose topics of discussion, which are part of the work in class. Finally, writing skills are developed through essays written in class or at home. The course is adapted to the students’ interests, needs, and level of mastery. By the end of level 3, students can ask and answer complex questions and maintain conversations on a variety of topics. They can write and read basic argumentative texts.
  • French 4

    French 4, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French 3 with a B or better and/or teacher recommendation*.
    With this course, students build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of French language and culture and developing their communication skills. Students learn how to provide structured arguments to support their opinions and how to construct hypotheses. Consistent use of French in the classroom develops skills in aural comprehension and oral expression. Productive and receptive skills in writing are refined through careful selections of written compositions and reading assignments drawn from French literature, magazines, newspapers, or electronic media. The course is task-based.By the end of level 4, students can converse with relative ease and discuss topics of personal interest. They can be understood without difficulty, even by those unaccustomed to non-native speakers. They can usually understand a few details of what they overhear in conversations provided that they are familiar with their context. In writing, they can describe and narrate events in all time frames using paragraph-like discourse.
  • French and Francophone Cultural Topics Through Cinema

    Studies of French and Francophone Contemporary Cultural Topics Through Cinema: 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French CAS or French 4 with a B+ or better and/or teacher recommendation.
    The course is designed for students with a good level of fluency. Students expand their knowledge of French language and contemporary culture. They work on their ability to understand spoken French in various contexts and refine their oral and written communication skills by discussing the films as well as their cultural background. They are exposed to an ample selection of Francophone films exploring cultural themes such as immigration, family, school, working conditions, criminality, the notion of culture and of cultural exception. The study of the topics introduced by the films is complemented by the students' own research and the reading of current newspaper articles.  They are trained to express themselves coherently, resourcefully and with fluency, as well as accurately in both written and spoken French. 
  • French Lit and Culture Honors

    Literature and Culture from France and Francophone Countries (Honors): 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: French CAS or French 4 with a B+ or better and/or teacher recommendation.
    Students can demonstrate fluency and literacy appropriate to this level. They build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of French language and culture through the formal study of representative literary texts written by diverse Francophone authors, from the 16th century to contemporary writers. They are exposed to different genres and writers varied in genders, origins, and social status. While understanding the historical context of French literature, the students learn to use pertinent concepts and relevant terminology to analyze form and content of the literary works through different perspectives. Elements of literary analysis and style include the following: diction, syntax, metric (rules of versification, alexandrines etc.), point of view, tone, irony, organization, imagery, figurative language, themes, rhetorical devices, and character analysis. By the end of each unit, students will demonstrate their ability to think and write critically throughout genres and periods.
  • Hispanic Lit & Culture

    Studies in Hispanic Literature and Culture, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Spanish 3 with a B+ or better and teacher recommendation.
    This course is designed for students who demonstrate a strong level of oral and written proficiency in Spanish and are motivated to refine their writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills through careful reading and critical analysis of Spanish and Latin American literature. This class is taught entirely in Spanish. Students are expected to lead and encourage discussion among their peers about the readings presented in class and to demonstrate their writing ability and literary comprehension. The class explores social, cultural, historical, and political events and movements that have taken place in both parts of the world and examines how these have influenced and are reflected in Spanish language narrative, poetry, drama, and film. Through discussions of texts, students examine social justice topics of relevance to their own identities and social environment. By the end of this course, students can converse almost fluently, write analytical and creative compositions, understand literary works within the context of culture, and have greater knowledge of major literary movements, genres, periods, and authors.
  • Latin 1

    Latin 1, 1-year foreign language credit (not offered every year).
    The text for Latin 1 is Latin via Ovid, a comprehensive text that presents the Greek myths, in adapted readings, as they were told by the Roman poet Ovid. The course covers the grammatical and syntactical concepts which are taught in the two-year sequence at Crossroads Middle School. The course also stresses the etymology of English words derived from Latin, as well as the discussion and analysis of myths as they relate to contemporary culture. This class requires a minimum of eight students in order to be offered.
  • Latin 2

    Latin 2, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: successful completion of Latin 1.
    The primary goal of Latin 2 is the advancement of reading and grammatical skills in Latin. Students continue the Cambridge Latin Course begun in the Middle School, moving to the more challenging Latin of Unit 3. Students further their study of myth, history, and art. Cultural topics are discussed as they occur in the readings. The military system and province of Britain are the focus of the early part of the year, while the city of Rome is the focal point of the later part.
  • Latin 3

    Latin 3, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Latin 2 with a C+ or better and teacher recommendation.
    Latin 3 students complete the study of Latin grammar and begin to read such authors as Caesar, Catullus, Cicero, Virgil, Ovid, Pliny, and Apuleius in the original text. These writings provide students with a strong understanding of the sources of Western history and thought, which students are encouraged to apply to the contemporary world. Poetry is represented by selections from the writings of Catullus, Vergil, Ovid, and Martial, prose by selections from Caesar's Gallic War and Pliny’s Letters. Students review grammar as they read the texts, and they are introduced to literary criticism, including the figures of speech and Alexandrian poetic techniques as they appear in the poetry of Catullus and Martial. Aspects of Roman culture and history of the first centuries BCE and CE are taught.
  • Latin 3 Honors

    Latin 3 Honors, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Latin 2 with a B+ or better, and teacher recommendation.
    Latin 3 Honors adheres to the general outline of the Latin 3 curriculum but works at an accelerated pace and at a higher level of rigor. Students in Latin 3 Honors are expected to be highly motivated, genuinely engaged in the learning process, and willing to take full responsibility for their learning; they are expected to memorize vocabulary quickly and retain it long-term, grasp concepts readily, translate effortlessly with precise attention to grammar and structure, and produce quality homework punctually.
  • Latin 4 and 5

    Latin 4, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Latin 3 or 3 Honors with a grade of B- or better and teacher recommendation.
    Students in this class read selections of original Latin prose and poetry. The curriculum includes such authors as Lucretius, Catullus, Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Vergil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Petronius, Martial, Pliny the Younger, and Apuleius. The pace of the class is less rigorous than that of Latin 4 Honors and includes an integrated review of Latin grammar. Class discussions and course projects emphasize literary and artistic aspects of the works, as well as their political, social, and cultural backgrounds.

    Latin 5, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Latin 4 or Latin 4 Honors with a B- or better and teacher recommendation.
    Students in this class read selections of original Latin prose and poetry. The curriculum includes such authors as Lucretius, Catullus, Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Vergil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Petronius, Martial, Pliny the Younger, and Apuleius. The pace of the class is less rigorous than that of the Advanced Studies course and includes an integrated review of Latin grammar and vocabulary. Class discussions and course projects emphasize literary and artistic aspects of the works as well as their political, social, and cultural backgrounds.
  • Latin 4 Honors

    Latin 4 Honors, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Latin 3 with an A or Latin 3 Honors with an A- or better and teacher recommendation.
    Latin 4 Honors students read original Latin prose and poetry at an accelerated pace and at a high level of rigor. The curriculum includes such authors as Lucretius, Catullus, Caesar, Cicero, Sallust, Vergil, Horace, Livy, Ovid, Petronius, Martial, Pliny the Younger, and Apuleius. Students closely analyze texts to further develop their skills in literary criticism. To enhance their appreciation of the literature, students continue their study of Roman history, mythology, and art.
  • Spanish 1

    Spanish 1, 1-year foreign language credit.
    This course requires no prior knowledge of Spanish. Students are introduced to the basics of the language and culture through active communication. There is a focus on the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Listening comprehension and oral expression skills are developed through the consistent use of the target language in the classroom as well as the use of authentic documents (real life recordings, songs, films, etc.). Reading comprehension skills are developed through the use of varied Spanish texts such as advertisements, blogs, and official forms. Writing assignments are modeled on the reading comprehension documents. The course is task-based and involves numerous group activities. By the end of level 1, students are able to understand and use familiar everyday expressions and basic phrases to fulfill specific tasks. They are able to introduce themselves and others and ask and answer questions about personal details such as where they live, people they know, and things they have. They are able to interact in a simple way provided the other person is talking slowly and clearly. This course is taught entirely in Spanish.
  • Spanish 2

    Spanish 2, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Spanish 1 with a C or better and teacher recommendation*.
    Students in this course build on the basics of the language introduced in Spanish 1 while expanding their knowledge of the language and culture and developing their communication skills. Only Spanish is used in the classroom. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Authentic documents and varied texts are used to refine students' listening, reading, and speaking skills. Writing assignments modeled on the reading comprehension texts incorporate different time frames. The course is task based and involves numerous group activities. By the end of level 2, students understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance, such as personal information and experiences, leisure activities, health and diet, and travel. They can communicate using phrases and simple sentences and can handle short social interactions in a variety of situations. They can describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment, and interests.
  • Spanish 3

    Spanish 3, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Spanish 2 with a C or better and teacher recommendation*.
    Students in this course build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of the language and culture and developing their communication skills. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They learn to express their wishes, emotions and doubts, and to hypothesize. Students read and discuss a variety of authentic texts and explore the Spanish-speaking world through varied written and oral projects. The course is task based and involves numerous group activities, such as creating advertisements and preparing for a job interview. Consistent use of Spanish in the classroom develops skills in aural comprehension and oral expression. Reading and writing skills are refined through meaningful and engaging texts and compositions. By the end of level 3, students can ask and answer questions, and can maintain simple conversations on most familiar topics using sentences and series of sentences. They can write and understand different styles of narrative texts.
  • Spanish 3 Honors

    Spanish 3 Honors, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Spanish 2 with a B+ or better and teacher recommendation.
    This course is designed for proficient and motivated students interested in advanced Spanish classes. Students build on their previous learning experience while expanding their knowledge of the language and culture. Emphasis continues to be placed on the development of the following skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students work at a faster and more intensive pace than in regular Spanish 3. Oral communication is stressed in the form of class discussions involving the readings and cultural topics. Students have the opportunity to work on group projects and to choose topics of discussion. Writing skills are developed through essays written in class or at home. The course is adapted to the students’ interests, needs, and level of mastery. By the end of level 3, students can communicate and write on a variety of topics using connected sentences. They can read and write basic argumentative texts and ask and answer complex questions.
  • Spanish 4

    Spanish 4, 1-year foreign language credit, prerequisite: Spanish 3 with C+ or better and/or teacher recommendation*.
    This course is designed to provide a context for the continued development of Spanish listening, speaking, reading, and writing. For those students who demonstrate interest in improving communication skills in the target language. Spanish language films are integrated into the curriculum, as well as the works of Hispanic contemporary authors and cultural topics. The course provides extensive oral practice with emphasis on communication and listening skills in Spanish and is designed to increase command of written Spanish and teach strategies for reading more complex texts in the target language. Students are expected to be actively engaged in class discussions, do oral presentations, record and listen to audios, learn songs, interview native speakers, and write and read about a variety of familiar topics. Some of the thematic topics include news and world events, travel and tourism, formulating arguments, traditions of the Spanish speaking world, giving advice, discussing feelings and characteristics, sports and leisure, and future plans. Grammar is reviewed and studied only as it supports communicative accuracy and better understanding of the language. By the end of level 4, students can converse with relative ease and discuss topics of personal and general interest. They understand the main idea when reading a variety of styles of texts and can describe and narrate events in all time frames using paragraph-like discourse when writing.

Our Faculty

Middle and Upper School: 21st Street Campus | 1714 21st St., Santa Monica, CA 90404 | Phone: (310) 829-7391
Elementary School: Norton Campus | 1715 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404 | Phone: (310) 828-1196
Crossroads School for Arts & Sciences provides a unique K-12 program built on a progressive, developmental model of education.